Dance sport – Canada Dance Sport http://www.canadadancesport.com/ Wed, 04 Aug 2021 15:36:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://www.canadadancesport.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-01T220142.037-150x150.png Dance sport – Canada Dance Sport http://www.canadadancesport.com/ 32 32 Devon Allen on the track tonight, sport climbing medals – and how to watch the men’s basketball semi-finals at the Tokyo Olympics – NBC New York http://www.canadadancesport.com/devon-allen-on-the-track-tonight-sport-climbing-medals-and-how-to-watch-the-mens-basketball-semi-finals-at-the-tokyo-olympics-nbc-new-york/ http://www.canadadancesport.com/devon-allen-on-the-track-tonight-sport-climbing-medals-and-how-to-watch-the-mens-basketball-semi-finals-at-the-tokyo-olympics-nbc-new-york/#respond Wed, 04 Aug 2021 15:04:48 +0000 http://www.canadadancesport.com/devon-allen-on-the-track-tonight-sport-climbing-medals-and-how-to-watch-the-mens-basketball-semi-finals-at-the-tokyo-olympics-nbc-new-york/ There is no shortage of must-see actions on Day 13 of the Tokyo Olympics. The United States Women’s National Football Team is looking for a medal after another disappointing performance as Kevin Durant and the United States Men’s Basketball Team move closer to gold. The first medals in sport climbing will be awarded (it’s a […]]]>

There is no shortage of must-see actions on Day 13 of the Tokyo Olympics. The United States Women’s National Football Team is looking for a medal after another disappointing performance as Kevin Durant and the United States Men’s Basketball Team move closer to gold.

The first medals in sport climbing will be awarded (it’s a brand new Olympic sport this year) and two Americans are vying for the podium. And, of course, another exciting athletic slate features fan favorites Grant Holloway and Devon Allen, known for his recent dance moves, in a packed final of 110 m hurdles men.

Without further ado, here are our 4 to watch for on day 13:

DON’T MISS THE ACTION: For a complete overview of all of the day’s events in Tokyo, visit the streaming program page for NBCOlympics.com. Watch every event live there, on the NBC Sports app and connected set-top boxes and watch prime time highlights on NBC.

1. USWNT aim for bronze against Australia

The United States women’s soccer team lost to Canada 1-0 in the semifinals on Monday, missing an opportunity to play for gold for the second consecutive Olympics.

The United States women’s soccer team appears to be recovering from a crushing semi-final loss to Canada in their bronze medal match against Australia.

After winning four of the first five gold medals in women’s Olympic football history, the United States team failed to advance to the final in consecutive games. The US was tied scorelessly with Canada until Jessie Fleming defeated Adrianna Franch on a 74th-minute penalty for the only goal of the game.

Now Megan Rapinoe, Carli Lloyd of New Jersey and the rest of the USWNT are turning their attention to Australia. Needing a win or draw against Australia in the round robin, the Americans scored one point in a 0-0 draw against the Australians on July 27.

It’s not gold, but after missing the podium together at the Rio 2016 Olympics, the USWNT will be hungry in Thursday’s tilt. Sweden and Canada will meet for the gold medal Thursday night at 10 p.m. ET. Watch it here.

FOLLOWING: See all the best football goals of the women’s tournament in Tokyo


2. Grant Halloway, Fan Favorite, Ryan Crouser Chase Track and Field Gold

Team USA’s Grant Holloway, Devon Allen and Daniel Roberts all advanced to the men’s 110m hurdles semifinals. The three Americans will face off on Tuesday night for a chance to compete for gold in the final.

Three finals are scheduled for Wednesday night’s track and field action: the men’s triple jump, the men’s shot put and the men’s 110m hurdles.

Grant Holloway leads a group of three American men in the final of the 110m hurdles. He set the fastest qualifying time in 13.02, just 0.22 seconds off the world record set by American Aries Merritt in 2012. He will be joined by teammates Devon Allen, who made the headlines for a dance, and Daniel Roberts.

The men’s shot put final will also feature three Americans. Ryan Crouser, the world and Olympic record holder, is the favorite, while Joe Kovacs and Payton Otterdahl were the last two to qualify.

Two Americans will compete in the men’s triple jump final. Will Claye (No.2) is the highest ranked athlete in the final, while Donald Scott is No.5. Claye’s personal best (18.14m) is 0.05m longer than the Olympic record.

Wednesday night’s roster also includes men’s decathlon, women’s heptathlon, women’s high jump qualification and round 1 of the men’s and women’s 4x100m relays.

Athletics returns with another session early Thursday which will include the finals in the women’s pole vault and the men’s 400m. On top of that, there are races in the women’s 4x400m relay and the men’s 1500m, while the men’s decathlon and women’s heptathlon will crown their champions.

FOLLOWING: Devon Allen celebrates with dance after his half-win in the 110m hurdles


3. American men’s basketball faces Australia in the semi-finals

Team USA men’s basketball advanced to the semi-finals after beating Spain. Kevin Durant led the charge for the United States, but it wasn’t easy to get around a stellar performance by Spaniard Ricky Rubio.

Team USA are two wins away from their fourth straight gold in men’s basketball, and their next test will be against Australia in the semi-finals.

After a disturbing opening loss to France, the United States’ men strung together three straight wins against Iran, the Czech Republic and Spain. Kevin Durant, the all-time new Olympic scorer in American men’s basketball, Damian Lillard and Jayson Tatum are among the stars of the United States through four games, Durant scoring a team-record 29 points in a victory. in the quarterfinals against Spain on Tuesday. .

Australia are unbeaten for Thursday’s semi-final. Patty Mills, Joe Ingles and Co. went 3-0 in the group game before giving Argentina an unbalanced 38-point quarter-final loss on Tuesday. Australia is on the hunt for their first ever Olympic men’s basketball medal.

The winner of the USA-Australia team will face the winner of Slovenia-France in the gold medal match on Friday August 6, while the two losers will play for bronze on Saturday August 7.

FOLLOWING: Argentina veteran Luis Scola receives heartbreaking ovation


4. Colin Duffy tries to reach the 1st Olympic sport climbing podium

After sport climbing made its Olympic debut on Tuesday, US climbers Colin Duffy and Nathaniel Coleman will battle it out for the sport’s first-ever Olympic gold medal on Thursday.

On Thursday, two Americans will try to climb to the top of the walls – and the rankings – at the Aomi urban sports park in Tokyo.

Colin Duffy and Nathaniel Coleman of Team USA are among eight athletes competing in the first Olympic Sport Climbing Final. Duffy came third overall in qualifying after placing sixth in sprint, fifth in bouldering and second in lead.

Coleman, on the other hand, was eighth overall and the last to qualify for the final. He placed 10th in speed, 11th in bouldering and fifth in the lead.

Frenchman Mickael Mawem finished first in the qualifying standings, while Japan’s Tomoa Narasaki Tomoa finished second.

The action begins with the sprint final at 4:30 a.m. ET on Thursday, progresses to the bouldering final an hour later, and begins the leading final at 8:10 a.m. ET. As climbers face three different disciplines, medals will be awarded to the top three in the overall standings.

FOLLOWING: What’s new in Tokyo? Everything you need to know about sport climbing



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Raven Saunders X podium protest: what it means and why the IOC is investigating http://www.canadadancesport.com/raven-saunders-x-podium-protest-what-it-means-and-why-the-ioc-is-investigating/ http://www.canadadancesport.com/raven-saunders-x-podium-protest-what-it-means-and-why-the-ioc-is-investigating/#respond Tue, 03 Aug 2021 06:30:00 +0000 http://www.canadadancesport.com/raven-saunders-x-podium-protest-what-it-means-and-why-the-ioc-is-investigating/ The 25-year-old raised her hands and crossed them in an X-shape as she and her fellow medalists posed for photos, telling NBC it was “the intersection where all the oppressed meet. “. Saunders – a black LGBTQ athlete – won her first Olympic medal on Saturday, finishing with a distance of 19.79 meters. Chinese Gong […]]]>

The 25-year-old raised her hands and crossed them in an X-shape as she and her fellow medalists posed for photos, telling NBC it was “the intersection where all the oppressed meet. “.

Saunders – a black LGBTQ athlete – won her first Olympic medal on Saturday, finishing with a distance of 19.79 meters.

Chinese Gong Lijiao won gold and New Zealander Valerie Adams bronze.

And after winning her medal, she says she wants to be a role model for others like her.

“For me, just to be what I’ve always aspired to be, to be able to be me and not apologize (and) show the younger generation that it doesn’t matter what they tell you, it doesn’t matter how many boxes there are. she’s trying to get you into, you can be you, ”she told media.

“People tell me not to get tattoos and piercings, but now look at me I’m having a blast.”

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) has noted it examines the gesture Saunders made on the podium, a potential violation of the rules banning medal podium protests.

“We are in contact with the US Olympic and Paralympic Committee and with World Athletics,” IOC spokesperson Mark Adams said on Monday. “I don’t want to say what those next steps would be until we fully understand what’s going on. We don’t want to anticipate anything.”

“We try to respect the views of all the athletes; we gave them more opportunities to express themselves. Freedom of expression in press conferences, social media, the mixed zone. We created possibilities. before the sport starts to protest.

“But one thing we noticed was that we did a survey of 3,500 athletes (and) everyone who responded wanted to protect the playing field. It would be nice if everyone could stick to the point of view of athletes. “

In response to a tweet about his gesture, Saunders tweeted: “Let them try to take this medal. I’m running across the border even though I can’t swim.”

‘Keep fighting, keep pushing, keep finding value in yourself’

With her eye-catching mask and celebration after winning her medal – she twerked then followed it up with another dancing for the cameras – Saunders is one of the biggest characters in the Tokyo Summer Games.

However, she has already faced a difficult personal battle.

Between the Rio 2016 Games and Tokyo, Saunders face difficult personal challenges, suffering from depression and suicidal thoughts. She spoke to CNN earlier this year about a time when “everything went over the top” and how she found support through therapy, meditation, and communication with close friends.

Now she wants to encourage others struggling with their mental health to get the support they need.

“My message is to keep fighting, to keep pushing, to keep finding value in yourself, in everything you do,” she said after winning her silver medal.

“It means a lot to be able to come away with a silver medal because I represent so many people. I know there are so many people who admire me, so many people who have sent me a message, so many people. who prayed for me.

“I’m happy to be able to bring this back for them, not just for me.”

Mental Health

The subject of athlete mental health was a hot topic of discussion at the Tokyo Games after American gymnast Simone Biles withdrew from numerous competitions citing her sanity.

Saunders’ nickname – “Hulk” after the Marvel superhero – is due to the similarities between his mental health journey and the journey of the great green superhero.

Saunders competes in the women's shot put final.

“When I initially became the Hulk, I didn’t know how to tell Hulk from Raven. It was a bit difficult to fight between the two, but over the course of life I was forced to face certain things and learn to compartmentalize, control the Hulk and use the Hulk in the right way.

“I keep it for competitions so Raven can have fun, reaching out to people, going to therapy, doing yoga, meditating – all of those things to create a strong mind. Without a strong mind, you can’t have a strong body. “

George Ramsay contributed to this report.



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Athletes Respond Like Tradition, Modern Spectacle Converges at Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games Opening Ceremony – NBC 7 San Diego http://www.canadadancesport.com/athletes-respond-like-tradition-modern-spectacle-converges-at-tokyo-2020-olympic-games-opening-ceremony-nbc-7-san-diego/ http://www.canadadancesport.com/athletes-respond-like-tradition-modern-spectacle-converges-at-tokyo-2020-olympic-games-opening-ceremony-nbc-7-san-diego/#respond Fri, 23 Jul 2021 19:15:09 +0000 http://www.canadadancesport.com/athletes-respond-like-tradition-modern-spectacle-converges-at-tokyo-2020-olympic-games-opening-ceremony-nbc-7-san-diego/ After a year of delay, athletes and performers took to the pitch at Tokyo Olympic Stadium for the opening ceremony of the XXXII Olympiad on Friday night, which served as a tribute to Japan’s rich history and a celebration of the athletes. of more than 200 delegations competing in the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. A powerful […]]]>

After a year of delay, athletes and performers took to the pitch at Tokyo Olympic Stadium for the opening ceremony of the XXXII Olympiad on Friday night, which served as a tribute to Japan’s rich history and a celebration of the athletes. of more than 200 delegations competing in the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

A powerful opening streak began with middleweight boxer and nurse Arisa Tsubata running alone on a treadmill, replicating the lonely training experience of Olympic athletes during the COVID-19 pandemic. As more athletes became visible on the pitch, the digital projections around them symbolized the unifying power of the sport, showing that they were together despite their physical separation. The theme of cohesion was further punctuated by elastic bands physically connecting the performers in a dazzling visual spectacle.

Getty Images

Modern technological staging merged with Japanese tradition throughout the opening ceremony. After a moving performance of the Japanese national anthem “Kimi Ga Yo” by Japanese singer and songwriter Misia, the Edo Firemanship Preservation Association performed the traditional Japanese working song “Kiyari Uta” as she “built” rings Giant Olympic Games in wood carved from trees planted in Japan by athletes from each of the nations participating in the 1964 Olympic Games. These games were held on the site of the current Tokyo Olympic Stadium. The performance also included incredible footwork from Japanese tap dancer Kumagai Kazunori.

With the placement of the Olympic rings in front of the stadium mount. Fuji’s centerpiece bringing the opening ceremony full circle, it was time for the parade of nations. In a historic first, each delegation was allowed two standard bearers – a man and a woman – to represent gender equality at the Olympic Games. Argentina caught the world’s attention from the start with the loudest entry of the night, as the athletes showed little restraint despite the physical challenges that await them for the next two weeks. Meanwhile, shirtless feeling Pita Taufatofua of Tonga continued to gain social media attention during her third opening ceremony appearance, five years after going viral in Rio.

See the post on social networks: https://twitter.com/pitaTofua/status/1418583225723613186

See the post on social networks: https://twitter.com/TODAYshow/status/1418564618058878981

The United States team entered the procession penultimate, with flag bearers Sue Bird (basketball) and Eddy alvarez (baseball) offering their frank thoughts as they entered the stadium.

“The energy is crazy,” Bird said. “I know our country is going through a difficult time right now, but right now we all feel united and it’s amazing.”

An excited Alvarez added: “It’s absolutely amazing. Thank god I have Sue here supporting me, because I’m freaking out a bit, guys. I will not lie.

Megan Rapinoe of the United States women’s soccer team said she couldn’t be prouder of her flag bearer fiancee, Bird.

See the post on social networks: https://www.instagram.com/p/CRrMU9kgCtR/

Rapinoe and his team were unable to attend the Opening Ceremony due to their schedule, but that didn’t stop the team from celebrating in their own way, as evidenced by Alex Morgan’s post.

See the post on social networks: https://twitter.com/alexmorgan13/status/1418588064515956745

Naya Tapper of the US women’s rugby team, meanwhile, took to Twitter to show off her ceremonial style.

See the post on social networks: https://twitter.com/Nayatapper/status/1418604584038068224

As the athletes stood united at the Olympic Stadium in Tokyo, the International Olympic Committee’s slogan, “Faster, Higher, Stronger, Together” appeared on the pitch, marking the start of a dazzling display of 1,824 drones that formed the Tokyo 2020 logo and a glowing globe hovering over Tokyo. Angelique Kidjo, Ajejandro Sanz, John Legend and Keith Urban led a performance of John Lennon’s “Imagine” before Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee Chairman Hashimoto Seiko and International Olympic Committee Chairman Thomas Bach address to athletes and a global audience.

“Today is a time of hope,” Bach said. “Yes, it’s very different from what we all imagined. But let’s cherish this moment – well, we’re all here together. “

Getty Images

Following the Olympic flag-raising ceremony, an innovative and surprisingly physical pantomime performance gave 50 of the Games pictograms – originally created for the 1964 Tokyo Games – a vibrant life like never before.

A kabuki dance and piano performance by Grammy-winning Hiromi cleansed the arena of negative energy to make way for Olympic torchbearers, including Japanese athletes and medical professionals. In the end, a 23-year-old Japanese tennis player Naomi Osaka was the last torchbearer, ascending to the cauldron at the top of Mount Olympic Stadium. Fuji-inspired main stage to light the flame and conclude one of the most memorable Opening Ceremonies in Olympic history.

Osaka took to Twitter after the ceremony, calling it “the greatest sporting achievement and honor” she will ever have in her life.

See the post on social networks: https://twitter.com/naomiosaka/status/1418602684580438019?s=20



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From lukewarm passion to burning passion: Campbell of Brunswick prepared for his Olympic race | International http://www.canadadancesport.com/from-lukewarm-passion-to-burning-passion-campbell-of-brunswick-prepared-for-his-olympic-race-international/ http://www.canadadancesport.com/from-lukewarm-passion-to-burning-passion-campbell-of-brunswick-prepared-for-his-olympic-race-international/#respond Fri, 23 Jul 2021 03:15:00 +0000 http://www.canadadancesport.com/from-lukewarm-passion-to-burning-passion-campbell-of-brunswick-prepared-for-his-olympic-race-international/ Tony Lawson, then the Brunswick High boys’ outdoor track coach, had to run alone in 2009 after the last school bell rang. He was trying to chase Luke Campbell – a slim and agile freshman football and basketball player for the Railroaders who, despite a year as a runner and jumper in the Potomac Valley […]]]>

Tony Lawson, then the Brunswick High boys’ outdoor track coach, had to run alone in 2009 after the last school bell rang.

He was trying to chase Luke Campbell – a slim and agile freshman football and basketball player for the Railroaders who, despite a year as a runner and jumper in the Potomac Valley Youth Association – had decided not to join. to the Brunswick athletics team.

Lawson was not fast enough.

“He was gone,” Lawson said of his unsuccessful quest. “He didn’t want anything to do with it. “

Eventually, the two made up for it. And Campbell, following in his older brother Robin’s footsteps on the track, agreed to join Lawson’s ranks in the spring of his sophomore year, though sports aren’t “a big priority” in the boy’s life.

At the end of the next three years, however, sweeping changes took place. For example, at that point Lawson had to tell Campbell, no, actually, he couldn’t bring that starting block or obstacle home to practice in his spare time.

By the end of the next three years, Campbell was an early comer and late in spring training. The track – and especially the hurdles – had become Campbell’s main focus. Its outlet.

Campbell, 26, is now in Japan.

He achieved this after devoting himself entirely to Brunswick. After an unprecedented academic career at Salisbury University, where he fell in love with his event. After moving to Germany – where her mother was born, giving her dual citizenship – to gain a better base to run towards her dreams. After taking all the necessary measures for this purpose. After losing her mother to cancer in early 2020. After using stopping the pandemic as a way to heal her wounds and prepare.

After all that, Campbell is preparing to run the 400-meter hurdles for Germany at the Tokyo Olympics.

Since Lawson wooed him 12 years ago, Campbell’s relationship with the sport of track and field has reached almost 180 degrees – from lukewarm passion to searing passion.

When he learned earlier this month that he had officially made the German Olympic team, Campbell said – by emailing the News-Post – that it was “an indescribable feeling”.

“It was a dream of mine pretty early on,” he said. “During my first year of college I really started to enjoy athletics, and hurdles in particular, but it wasn’t until my second year at Salisbury that I could really imagine going any further. and make those thoughts someday a reality. “

Development

When Lawson finally got his hands on Campbell in 2010, hurdles were a given. Lawson had recognized Campbell’s smooth footwork on the football field, his ability to jump on the basketball court.

“But the most important thing was his height,” Lawson said of Campbell, who is 6 feet 2 inches tall. “He’s extremely tall and thin, so, hey, I was like, let’s give it a try.”

Lawson remembers putting Campbell at ease with the pace of, say, the 110-meter high hurdles: seven steps from the start, three steps between the hurdles. The novice got it “without a hitch,” the coach said.

Campbell began to improve steadily, then began to take off in several events as a junior.

Then there was a hitch. Off road.

Campbell’s parents, Anne and Patrick, had separated. Robin Campbell said Luke solved the difficulty at home by rebelling in certain ways. Not necessarily getting into trouble, but making bad choices that are often presented to teens.

Lawson, who works in law enforcement, heard about it and was not happy. He found an opportunity to intervene, stopped next to Campbell one day and said, “GET IN THE CAR NOW.”

Lawson took Campbell home for a tense reunion with his mother.

Robin said: “They did a good job bringing him back.”

From then on, the track took on many roles for Campbell. It has become a diversion. Comfort. One way to make his parents proud. An accelerator of his thirst to excel.

“It just drove him to do something big,” Robin said.

In May of his senior year at Brunswick, Luke won three state championships in the Class 1A competition, winning both the hurdles and high jump titles, an event Lawson said Campbell was training rarely.

“Then he went to college,” Robin said, “and that was something else.”

Success was swift and sustained for Campbell at Salisbury, a Division III school, even as he adjusted to college life.

He won his first national championship in first year at the 110 high hurdles. Campbell basically didn’t stop winning for the rest of his career. He carved his name in the NCAA record books with a record 11 national titles.

Meanwhile, he began to think about building on his legacy: after college, he might move to Germany – where his parents met when his father was stationed there in the military – to try to represent this. country at the Olympics.

The 400 hurdles quickly became his exclusive event. He went to Germany in 2017 and teamed up with the country’s hurdles coach former Olympic gold medalist Volker Beck.

While learning a new language and culture as a resident of Frankfurt (not far from where two of his uncles live), Campbell also began to dramatically shave his best times as he faced off against the competition. of the elite.

“Germany has a smaller track program,” said Robin, “and with that, you get more of that one-on-one training – and you’ll get bigger in a smaller program.”

In his greatest achievement before Tokyo, Luke Campbell – who receives funding competing for track club LG Eintracht Frankfurt and serving in the Bundeswehr, the German military, as what he called a “sports soldier. »- reached the semi-finals at the 2019 World Championships.

His stay in Germany saw him cultivate an even closer connection with the event that consumed his devotion.

“Since I came back to Germany, I have come to really appreciate my event, because it has become my life in recent years,” he said. “Since then, I have spent a lot of time perfecting my art, analyzing every step, obstacle and movement.

“I see the art in the event.”

The event

The 400-meter hurdles, which has been part of the Men’s Olympic Games since 1900, is a grueling test of speed, endurance and technical fluidity. Distance is generally considered the longest sprint in the sport, but runners must also overcome 10 evenly spaced obstacles. For men, the hedges are 36 inches high.

“The reason it’s exhausting isn’t just because it’s physically demanding,” said John Grim, a longtime local track coach who has worked with the college’s 400 hurdles. “The 400-meter hurdles combine virtually all the fitness and technical parameters of the sport in one race.”

Mount St. Mary’s track coach Jay Phillips says the key to the 400 hurdles is to be a strong and fast runner. But he says it’s easier said than done – because the runner has to lead that speed and pace to a specific location 10 times to overcome obstacles.

“The ones I’ve seen to be the most successful make it feel like it’s effortless,” he said, “but if you know what you’re looking for it’s controlled strength and speed. . “

Grim referred to Edwin Moses, the two-time Olympic gold medalist in the event, as “poetry in motion”.

Phillips said the race is like a ballet dance.

The main challenge is to maintain this strict pace until the end – which can get terribly more difficult after each obstacle. So the last three can be perilous if lethargy begins to set in and the runner’s footsteps get out of hand.

“So much can happen in those last three or four hurdles if you can’t keep up with your pace,” Phillips said.

After the last curve, there are two hurdles left. And, “at this point,” said Grim, “they feel 10 feet tall.”

Technical concentration is essential for the duration.

Campbell’s best time in this event is 49.14 seconds. He is currently eighth in the ranking of the 400 hurdles in Europe, according to worldathletics.com.

He reached that position this season after an inactive 2020. If any track events had taken place during the pandemic, Campbell would have had to experience what he called unbearable pain due to edema in his leg and foot. Once he got over that, a torn calf in December put him on the sidelines for eight weeks.

Unsure he would be able to qualify for the Olympics, Campbell said it was “a stressful time.”

“[The pandemic] was a good thing in a way for him because he was injured, ”said Robin Campbell, who communicates regularly with his brother on WhatsApp. “He’s spent all this year recovering. “

The calf injury meant Luke needed more time to re-acclimatize to his event. When he started competing, however, he was able to start racking up the points needed to qualify for the Olympics through a ranking system.

There are 40 places for the 400 hurdles at the Olympics, he said. Rather than being part of the Olympic team by hitting the qualifying standard of 48.9 seconds, the point values ​​(based on competition size, time and location) for his top five performances were added up and compared to those of other competitors. He said he was ranked 16th out of 40.

“I feel confident heading into the Games,” he said. “I have shown a noticeable improvement every week and I am convinced that I am in better shape now than a year ago.”

He started considering this job years ago, and it’s one that his mom pushed him to support all the time.

Robin said their mother would say to Luke, “Don’t let anything stop you.

The shared dream

Luke Campbell returned to Frederick County in December 2019 to spend the vacation at home. But around this time, Anne – who had battled colorectal cancer for two and a half years – saw her health decline. Doctors said she was running out of time.

Anne had always expressed the certainty that her son would reach the Olympic stadium. When Lawson met her in 2019, she thanked him for what he had done for her son. And, Lawson said, she was adamant that Luke would be heading to Tokyo.

“Like, she just knew,” Robin said.

It was a dream she shared with her son. But he will live it without her, representing the country where she was born, the place where he was able to go – because of her – to help achieve his greatest ambition.

Anne passed away in January 2020.

“We got to see her in her final moments,” Robin said. “We have to talk to him and let it all hang out. It has helped a lot.

Luke may not have his mother present when he nods to the starter pistol on Thursday in Tokyo, but he’s also adamant about something: she will be with him every step of the way. Out of the blocks, between the obstacles, over them.

And certainly in that crucial home stretch – when a hurdler somehow has to keep everything together despite the threat of exhaustion.

Don’t let anything stop you.

“She was really my biggest fan,” said Campbell, “and I always carry her strength and energy whenever I step on the track before running, wherever she is in the universe.”


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BYU, Gonzaga among WCC winners during transfer portal season http://www.canadadancesport.com/byu-gonzaga-among-wcc-winners-during-transfer-portal-season/ http://www.canadadancesport.com/byu-gonzaga-among-wcc-winners-during-transfer-portal-season/#respond Tue, 20 Jul 2021 19:01:43 +0000 http://www.canadadancesport.com/byu-gonzaga-among-wcc-winners-during-transfer-portal-season/ SALT LAKE CITY – The transfer portal has played an important role in varsity athletics, but no sport is more impacted by the portal than varsity basketball. To build an NCAA tournament team, you probably need to be active on the portal. It’s the name of the game now, and BYU’s league, the West Coast […]]]>

SALT LAKE CITY – The transfer portal has played an important role in varsity athletics, but no sport is more impacted by the portal than varsity basketball. To build an NCAA tournament team, you probably need to be active on the portal. It’s the name of the game now, and BYU’s league, the West Coast Conference, is no different.

As the transfer portal madness ends as the rosters begin to lock down for the upcoming season, it’s time to take a look at the WCC winners and losers on the transfer portal.

WCC Transfer Portal Winners

BYU

Additions: Te’Jon Lucas (Guard, Milwaukee); Seneca Knight (Guard, LSU)

Departures: Connor Harding (UVU); Koly Lee (Dixie State); Wyatt Lowell (Snow College); Cameron Pearson

BYU has improved its roster by adding Te’Jon Lucas and Seneca Knight out of the portal. They have the appearance of another general bid team in the NCAA tournament. Te’Jon Lucas is teaming up with Alex Barcello to form one of the most experienced backcourt in the country and Knight, if he gets a waiver, fits well into all three.

Gonzaga

Additions: Rasir Bolton (Goalkeeper, Iowa State)

Departures: Oumar Ballo (Arizona); Aaron Cook (Georgia); Pavel Zakharov (California Baptist)

The Gonzaga Bulldogs, national finalists, continue to produce talent. The transfer season hasn’t been as active for the Zags as in previous years, but they still land All-Big 12 interpreter Rasir Bolton, who will have the heavy task of trying to replace Jalen Suggs.

Oumar Ballo was a loss to Arizona due to his high scout status, but he never gave in to the Zags’ rotation.

Saint Clare

Additions: Parker Braun (Avant, Missouri); Danilo Djuricic (forward, Harvard); PJ Pipes (Guard, Green Bay)

Departures: Ezekiel Richards (Northern Arizona); Trent Hudgens, Jr. (Northern Colorado); Austin Bags

This coming season looks to be the best lineup for Herb Sendek in his time with the Broncos. Santa Clara is sacking All-WCC performer Josip Vrankic for another season and teaming up with transfer portal headliners Danilo Djurici and PJ Pipes. The Broncos have the talent to be in the top three WCC teams this season.

Portland

Additions: Chris Austin (Garde, Fordham); Mike Meadows (Guard, Eastern Washington); Jack Perry (Guard, Eastern Washington); Tyler Robertson (forward, East Washington); Kristian Sjolund (forward, UTEP); Moses Wood (Forward, UNLV).

Departures: Chase Adams (SLCC); Ahmed Ali; Hayden Curtiss (State of Portland); Isiah Dasher (Saint-Pierre); Eddie Davis; Tahirou Diabaté (State of San Diego); Quincy Férébee; Clythus Griffith, Jr.; Mikey Henn (Denver); Latrell Jones (Nicholls State); Hunter Seymour (Cal State Dominguez Hills).

New Portland head coach Shantay Legans is revising a driver program that was just plain bad under Terry Porter. Legans is from eastern Washington and he’s brought a few talented players out of the portal, with former Georgia Tech and UTEP player Kristian Sjolund headlining, who shot 47% in three years. last at UTEP.

The Pilots will likely still be close to the bottom half of the league, but Legans injects some life into the Bluff, who haven’t been there since Eric Reveno was fired.

WCC Transfer Portal Losers

Sainte Marie

Additions: None

Departures: None

Randy Bennett sacked pretty much everyone from last year’s squad that reached the NIT. Yet in the age of college basketball, not actively pursuing transfers could backfire. The Gaels will be led by Logan Johnson, Tommy Kuhse and Matthias Tass.

The rest of the comings and goings of the WCC portal

Loyola Marymount

Additions: Gary Harris, Jr. (Guard, Siena); Kwane Marble II (Guard, Wyoming); Alex Merkviladze (forward, Cal State Northridge); Cameron Shelton (Guard, Northern Arizona)

Departures: Parker Dortch; Lazar Nekic

Peaceful

Additions: Alphonso Anderson (Forward, State of Utah); Luke Avdalovic (guard, northern Arizona); Nicquel Blake (Goalkeeper, UNLV); Sam Freeman (Center, Minnesota); Greg Outlaw (Guardian, Central Connecticut State)

Departures: Broc Finstuen (Cleveland State); Jervay Green (Talladega College); James Hampshire (UNLV); Daniss Jenkins; Jahbril Price-Noël (Wagner); Jonathan salazar

Pepperdine

Additions: Keith Fisher III (Forward, State of Illinois); Braun Hartfield (Goalkeeper, San Diego)

Departures: Sedrick Altman (Cavalier); Andre Ball (Cal State Dominguez Hills); Everett Perrot

San Diego

Additions: TJ Berger (Guard, Georgetown); Terrell Brown (Avant, Pitt); Marcellus Earlington (Forward, St. John’s); Bryce Monroe (Guardian, Sam Houston State); Jase Townsend (Goalkeeper, Denver)

Departures: Felipe Doria; Jason Gallant; Mikal Gjerde (Rockhurst); Braun Hartfield (Pepperdine); Frankie Hughes; Marion Humphrey (SLCC); Yauhen Massalski (San Francisco); Ben Pyle; Jared Rodriguez (State of Idaho); Finn sullivan

San Francisco

Additions: Yauhen Massalski (forward, San Diego); Zane Meeks (Avant, Nevada); Gabriele Stefani (Guard, Colombia); Patrick Tape (striker, duke)

Departures: Trevanta Anderson (Idaho); Samba Kane (Milwaukee); Damari Milstead (Cal State Fullerton); Antoine Roy.

Mitch Harper is a BYU insider for KSLsports.com and host of the Cougar Tracks podcast (SUBSCRIBE) and Cougar Sports Saturday (Saturday 12 p.m. to 3 p.m.) on KSL Newsradio. Follow him on Twitter: @Mitch_Harper.



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U of I announces spring 2021 graduates http://www.canadadancesport.com/u-of-i-announces-spring-2021-graduates/ http://www.canadadancesport.com/u-of-i-announces-spring-2021-graduates/#respond Tue, 20 Jul 2021 08:02:34 +0000 http://www.canadadancesport.com/u-of-i-announces-spring-2021-graduates/ Residents of the area are among those who graduated from the University of Idaho in early spring. A total of 1,522 degrees were dispensed. In-person ceremonies were held May 15-16 in Moscow; May 18 in Boise; and May 19 in Idaho Falls. Some of those who graduate (listed by name, college attended, degree, and major) […]]]>


Residents of the area are among those who graduated from the University of Idaho in early spring.

A total of 1,522 degrees were dispensed. In-person ceremonies were held May 15-16 in Moscow; May 18 in Boise; and May 19 in Idaho Falls.

Some of those who graduate (listed by name, college attended, degree, and major) include:

Bonners Ferry – Daniel J. Robinson, Art & Architecture, BS, Virtual Technology & Design; Jessica Betancourt, MedinaLetters Arts & Social Sc, BA, Spanish International Studies; Jessica Betancourt, MedinaLetters Arts & Social Sc, BA, Latin American Studies; Kenneth M. Marcy, Letters Arts & Social Sc, BA, English-Creative Writing; Nicholas J. Sabin, Ed, Health and Humanities, BSESHS ,. Exrc, Sprt, Hlth Sci-Fit / Hl / HmPf; Samantha J. Schneider, Science, BS Microbiol., Microbiology; and Shaleyna D. Higgins, Ed, Health & Human Sci, BSDan., Dance;

Careywood – Trista L. Spence, Art and Architecture, M.Arch., Architecture;

Clark Fork – Naomi F. Hlavka, humanities, arts and social sciences, BS, psychology; and Tessa J. Vogel, Art & Architecture, MS, Bioregional Plng & Comm Dsgn;

Cocolalla – Caden S. Gatlin, Ed, Health & Human Sci, BSESHS, Exer, Sprt, Hlth Sci-Pre-PT; James C. Leeson, Art & Architecture, BSLA, Landscape Architecture; and Rachel Sutton, Letters Arts & Social Sciences, BS, specialization in sociology-criminology;

Hope – Daniel Carlos, Letters Arts & Social Sciences, MPA, Public Administration;

Porthill – Seth C. Sutherland, Letters Arts & Social Sciences, BS, Communication;

Sagle – Bailey L. Potter, Ag & Life Sciences, BSFCS, CFCS-Child Dev Family Rel; Brock Browning, Ed, Health & Human Sci, BSRec., Rec, Sport, & Tourism Mgmt; Colten T. Engel, Business & Economics, BSBus., Marketing-Gen Mrktg Emph; Dakota J. Ward, Natural Resources, BS, Fire. School. Management. Ecology and fire management; Dakota J. Ward, Natural Resources, BSForestry, Forestry; Damon E. Miller, Letters Arts & Social Sciences, BGS, General Studies; Danika A. Moore, Ed, Health & Human Sci, BSEd., Secondary Education; James M. Bradley, Engineering, BSME, Mechanical Engineering; Reilly C. Wolfe, Engineering, BSCompE., Computer Engineering; Taylor A. Ward, Ed, Health and Humanities, BSESHS, Exer, Sprt, Hlth Sci-Pre-PT; Tyler Harris, Letters, Arts and Social Sciences, BGS, General Studies; and Tyler K. Kennedy, Letters Arts & Social Sc, BGS, General Study;

Sand Point – Adam O. Finney, right, JD, right; Cassidy A. Story, Engineering, BSME, Mechanical Engineering; Crystal L. Carney, Letters Arts & Social Sciences, BA, English-Literature Emph English-Professional Wrtg; Emily C. Branham, Ag & Life Sciences, BSPl.Sc., Horticulture & Urban Agric; Jacob M. Jackson, Engineering, BSComp.E., Computer Engineering; Jethro J. Shorman, Letters Arts & Social Sciences, BS, Advertising; Kari L. Gors, Letters Arts & Social Sciences, BS, Psychology; Kelley Kindred, Ed, Health and Humanities, MS, Adult Learning and Leadership / Organizations; Khloe M. Kyllonen, Science, BS, Medical Sciences; Koen N. Conner, Art & Architecture, BSArch., Architecture; Lane Rasmussen, Natural Resources, BS, Forestry Forestry; Saharah G. Chalupny, Letters Arts & Social Sciences, BA, English-Creative Writing Emph; Saharah G. Chalupny, Ag & Life Sciences, BSFCS, CFCS-Chld & Youth Dev Opt; Sarah R. Puryear, Letters Arts & Social Sciences, BS, Sociology-Criminology Emph; Sean P. Torrez, Science, BS, Opt Chemistry-Forensics; Sophia H. Bowen, engineering, BS, biological engineering; Torrin Bernardin, Letters Arts & Social Sciences, BS, Music-Applied Emph; Zarren T. Stoddard, Ed, Health and Humanities, BSESH, Exercise and Health Sciences; and Zarren T. Stoddard, Ed, Health & Human Sci, MSAT, Athletic Training.


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Rugby: Manu Samoa players defend a fan tackled by a security guard http://www.canadadancesport.com/rugby-manu-samoa-players-defend-a-fan-tackled-by-a-security-guard/ http://www.canadadancesport.com/rugby-manu-samoa-players-defend-a-fan-tackled-by-a-security-guard/#respond Mon, 19 Jul 2021 18:17:34 +0000 http://www.canadadancesport.com/rugby-manu-samoa-players-defend-a-fan-tackled-by-a-security-guard/ sport|RugbyUpdate July 19, 2021 6:39 AM3 minutes to read A security guard tackles the supporter who rushed onto the pitch to perform a traditional dance for the team. Photo / Photosport As a seemingly rogue rugby fan bursts onto the pitch, a security guard sprints towards him and brings him to the ground with an […]]]>
sport|Rugby

A security guard tackles the supporter who rushed onto the pitch to perform a traditional dance for the team. Photo / Photosport

As a seemingly rogue rugby fan bursts onto the pitch, a security guard sprints towards him and brings him to the ground with an impressive tackle.

But what happens next is probably something few people expected; as members of the Manu Samoa rugby team rush to help the supporter, then the security guard, from the ground.

As the fan – shirtless and showing off a traditional Samoan men’s tattoo, the pe’a – stands up, he begins to dance just as another security guard rushes over to grab him.

Again, the boys in blue appear to defend the audience member and offer some explanation to the guard.

The guards eventually back off – the first one sheepishly scratching his head as one of the players comforts him.

The incident was caught on camera and began to go viral after it was uploaded to social media sites TikTok, Instagram, Twitter and Facebook.

Some have wondered why the players rushed to defend the man the security guard had just tackled.

However, Samoan fans began to offer some explanation. The ventilator was simply responding according to normal cultural protocol.

“I mean, I understand that the security guard is only doing his job, but he [sic] we know the Samoans.

“This is how we celebrate and show respect. We join in the dance and celebrate together. The players know it …”

Manu Samoa had just officially qualified for the 2023 Rugby World Cup after beating Tonga rugby team Ikale Tahi 37-15 in Hamilton on Saturday night.

A security guard tackles the supporter who rushed onto the pitch to perform a traditional dance for the team.  Photo / Photosport
A security guard tackles the supporter who rushed onto the pitch to perform a traditional dance for the team. Photo / Photosport

As the players gather to celebrate, a member of the team steps forward and begins performing a traditional dance.
As the players gather to celebrate, a member of the team steps forward and begins performing a traditional dance.

As the players gather to celebrate, one of the team members steps forward and begins performing a traditional dance reflecting a taualuga.

Taualuga is a performance given at the end of any Samoan grand occasion or event that deserves celebration and encourages those in attendance to dance.

Lakapi Samoa’s high performance general manager Seumanu Douglas Ngau Chun said the organization does not condone or condone actions such as running on the playing field.

The security guards were doing their job and doing it well to protect the Manu Samoa team, he said.

“The supporter was known to the management and players of the Samoan community and knew his intention within the framework of our Samoan culture of Ai Uli in which to pay homage and honor our victory, but also knew that this was not in line with the World Rugby protocols and is not accepted behavior. “

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Track star Brittni Mason to represent Cleveland, dispel misconceptions at Tokyo Paralympic Games http://www.canadadancesport.com/track-star-brittni-mason-to-represent-cleveland-dispel-misconceptions-at-tokyo-paralympic-games/ http://www.canadadancesport.com/track-star-brittni-mason-to-represent-cleveland-dispel-misconceptions-at-tokyo-paralympic-games/#respond Sun, 18 Jul 2021 16:58:00 +0000 http://www.canadadancesport.com/track-star-brittni-mason-to-represent-cleveland-dispel-misconceptions-at-tokyo-paralympic-games/ CLEVELAND – Over the years, Brittni Mason has discovered that exercise is not just a way to stay in shape or let off the energy of competition. For the 23-year-old track star, the sport has relieved her body, specifically her shoulder and left arm, and she’s ready to show the world that disabilities don’t define […]]]>

CLEVELAND – Over the years, Brittni Mason has discovered that exercise is not just a way to stay in shape or let off the energy of competition. For the 23-year-old track star, the sport has relieved her body, specifically her shoulder and left arm, and she’s ready to show the world that disabilities don’t define a person.

Sport is the best medicine

Mason was born with Erb’s palsy, or brachial plexus palsy. Erb’s palsy is a birth injury that can develop when an infant’s neck is stretched to one side during a difficult delivery, causing temporary or permanent nerve damage. Since Erb’s palsy occurs in a network of nerves that control the muscles of the shoulders, elbows, wrists, and hands, while providing movement and sensation, the effects can be long lasting.

From an early age, Mason’s parents put her in physical therapy to help her reduce the limitations of her left arm. When she was around 10, Mason’s parents decided to add a mix of sports into her life to keep her active in the hopes that it would help her use her arm more.

“Track and field wasn’t my number one sport originally. I was a gymnast, a ballerina, I was in the dance company,” Mason said. “I also went swimming. And later in my life I kind of turned to physical contact sports. I played basketball and played sports consistently all year round just. to work that range of motion of my arm. “

Mason’s involvement in sports became therapeutic and she began to notice the effects it had on her body.

“Doing this actually helped me use my arm a lot more in my day-to-day life. So we found the sport to be very, very useful,” Mason said.

Rising track star

While Mason practiced several sports, it was by discovering athletics that she discovered a real passion and a remarkable talent.

“Once I was running around our house when I was a kid, and my dad was like, ‘Wow, she runs really fast. Let’s get her on the right track, “” recalls Mason. “And honestly, at the age of 10, that’s kind of how I got involved in the track.”

By the time Mason was 11, she was racing track and field in Cleveland for the Mustangs track team. Mason, new to the sport but quick on his feet, placed fifth in the country in the 100 and 200 meters.

It was then that she knew the track was her future.

Mason made his way through the records until high school. The West Geauga High School graduate set the district record for the 100m and 200m while winning district, regional conference and state championships during her high school years.

As she continued her college education, traveling to eastern Michigan where she is still in the process of obtaining her masters degree, Mason maintained her winning path, placing regularly in relays, 60-meter sprints and 100-meter sprints.

Then, in 2019, an opportunity presented itself to Mason, an opportunity that she did not see coming.

Towards gold

Two years ago, someone contacted Mason’s coach in Eastern Michigan to ask if she would be interested in competing in the Paralympic Games.

Mason then learned that her Erb’s paralysis made her eligible to participate in the Paralympic Games. With less than a month to train, Mason was about to make his debut at the World Championships in Dubai.

“I didn’t know I was going to go and it was pretty stressful because I was sort of in good shape, sort of going back to summer training and so I hadn’t sprinted since. about six or seven months, ”Mason said.

Despite the lack of time to train and prepare for the biggest stage of his track career, Mason impressed in Dubai by setting the world record in the 100 meters.

Mason’s start to Paralympic career was sparked by a world record and has now turned into qualifying for the 2021 Paralympic Games in Tokyo, where she is expected to run the 100m and 200m.

A few weeks before leaving for Japan, Mason is working hard to keep her arm fit and ready, which she has learned to do well over the years.

“I would constantly have muscle pushes where my shoulder would be super, super tight and I couldn’t move it and it would hurt so much. I would have a lot of pain,” Mason said. “The coaches didn’t know what to do with it. And so over time I just learned to learn my body – and I actually studied exercise science, so it helped me learn a lot more. my body – but I was able to find things to help me somehow reduce inflammation and work during my workouts. “

Mason said that running with Erb’s paralysis is a big part of conditioning his arm, like a person with asthma conditions his lungs.

On a very active routine, Mason runs longer to prevent his arm from getting tired during his runs while working push-ups and pull-ups during training to help him work on his range of motion.

Running may seem like a very leg-oriented sport, but the whole body is involved in sprinting, and with a tired, outstretched, or stiff arm, Mason’s performance can be significantly disrupted.

“It definitely affected me when I run, especially the longer runs,” Mason said. “As you get tired, once my arm stops pumping, it’s all fine.”

Representation is important

As she prepares to compete in the Tokyo Paralympic Games next month, Mason is eager to represent her hometown on the world stage while dispelling misconceptions surrounding the event.

“I never thought I’d be running after college and going to Tokyo to represent my country. And I currently have the fastest times in the world in my rankings. So that gave me a boost,” Mason said. . “I’m really excited to go out there, put Cleveland on the map and then represent the United States.”

Mason said being able to represent Cleveland was one of his biggest inspirations.

“It motivates me more because it’s like I don’t want to let my city down, I want to play for them so they have something to come home and brag about,” Mason said.

But there’s another motivator that fuels Mason on his quest for gold – showing that the Paralympics include a host of handicaps, even ones you might not be able to see.

“When I learned more about the Paralympics, I thought the same thing, which everyone usually thinks – amputee or in a wheelchair. I didn’t know I was eligible. And the fact that I was in a wheelchair. ran with able-bodied people all my life, I ran track and field in Division I middle school. I went to run track and field in high school against anyone who had the same disability as me – it just gave me feel like working twice as hard just to prove myself, “Mason said. “It took me until I was 21 to know that Erb’s paralysis was a thing for the Paralympic Games.”

Looking at Mason, you might not know that she lives with a disability – but it’s an idea of ​​the Paralympics and disabilities in general that she hopes she can help dispel running in Tokyo.

“I really want to be that person showing this exhibit. Like, ‘Hey, it’s not just amputees, it’s not just wheelchair runners.’ These people who have Erb’s palsy like me, or who have cerebral palsy and even visually impaired people who run, “Mason said. “It’s a lot more exciting to see a variety of these athletes adapting, having to adapt to so many different circumstances. And they kill him.”

Mason hopes people will tune in to the Paralympics to see her and her fellow athletes compete and represent people around the world living with different disabilities, some viable, some less, but all worthy of recognition.

“If people can connect and we can give them a show, that’s exactly what we’re going to do. That’s what I plan to do,” Mason said. “Even though the stands might be empty, I’m still looking to play and get the crowd excited and people to listen to us and watch us compete.”

The Paralympic Games will take place from August 24 to September 5. To learn more about events and competitions, click here.

RELATED: After overcoming adversity, Cleveland native Reggie Jagers III is ready for the Tokyo Olympics

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In Tokyo, one last dance for Sania Mirza | Olympic Games http://www.canadadancesport.com/in-tokyo-one-last-dance-for-sania-mirza-olympic-games/ http://www.canadadancesport.com/in-tokyo-one-last-dance-for-sania-mirza-olympic-games/#respond Sat, 17 Jul 2021 15:03:29 +0000 http://www.canadadancesport.com/in-tokyo-one-last-dance-for-sania-mirza-olympic-games/ In June, Sania Mirza posted a photo on her Instagram Stories – walking to Wimbledon with her tennis kit; hand in hand with his son Izhaan; back to the camera. The legend said: the last dance. Five years ago, when she was on the verge of winning an Olympic medal in Rio, the idea of […]]]>

In June, Sania Mirza posted a photo on her Instagram Stories – walking to Wimbledon with her tennis kit; hand in hand with his son Izhaan; back to the camera. The legend said: the last dance.

Five years ago, when she was on the verge of winning an Olympic medal in Rio, the idea of ​​her still flaunting her moves on the tennis court before the Tokyo Olympics was a far-fetched idea for Mirza.

“If someone had told me at the last Olympics that I would have another chance, I would have laughed at it,” said Mirza. “But hey, here I am. “

So here she is – getting ready for her fourth Olympic appearance at 34; dabble between being a tennis pro and a mother of a two-year-old; give his dreams of an elusive Olympic medal a final boost to reality by competing in the Tokyo Games with his doubles protected ranking of World No.9 in partnership with Ankita Raina.

Read also | Khel Ratna’s appointment inspires me to do better: javelin thrower Neeraj Chopra

It has been a physical and emotional roller coaster for Mirza in the longer-than-usual period between the two Olympics. In October 2017, a knee injury forced her to take time off tennis, a year in which she and her husband Shoaib Malik welcomed their baby boy. Then Mirza took small steps on her return to the sport herself, returning to the pro tour in January of last year and winning her return tournament in Hobart.

Then a calf injury at the Australian Open cut her off again. Then, Covid-19 made the whole world stop. Then Covid hit Mirza; she recovered from the virus and returned on tour in March of this year. Then the second wave that saw countries close their borders to Indians saw Mirza scramble to secure a British visa for her son to be with her as she prepared for Tokyo on the tour’s turf swing.

It took ministry-level intervention for the UK government to issue last-minute visas for Izhaan and Mirza’s sister, both of whom had to undergo hotel quarantines while Mirza competed at WTA Eastbourne ahead of Wimbledon. Mirza could not see Izhaan for nine days.

“It’s just difficult with the whole situation. I mean, it’s hard enough not having kids to be in there and travel during a pandemic, but with a toddler it gets even harder. But there’s not much we can do except accept it and deal with it in the best possible way, ”said Mirza.

Mirza will also have to stay away from her son for a few more days in Tokyo, because Izhaan will not accompany Mirza in the restricted environment of these Olympics. Why, then, is Mirza ready to go the extra mile in the final rounds of an already celebrated career in which she topped the doubles world rankings, won six Grand Slam titles and medals at the Asian Games and the Commonwealth Games?

Part of the answer lies in the only major title missing from the champion’s book, which Mirza was only a few good points off the script when she and Rohan Bopanna lost the mixed doubles semi-finals 6-2, 2-6, 3-10 against Americans Venus Williams and Rajeev Ram at the 2016 Games. The Indians then lost in the bronze medal match against Czech pair Radek Stepanek and Lucie Hradecka.

Five years later, Mirza finds meaning in this pain.

“It was one of the most painful moments of my life, not being able to win this (Olympic) medal after being so close to it. It was just extremely, extremely painful. Which in itself is pretty motivating for me now. And if you are not motivated for the Olympics, to compete for your country, then why do you even play tennis? I’m really, really motivated for Tokyo, ”said Mirza.

Men’s doubles and mixed have been India’s brightest Olympic medal hopefuls in tennis lately, with Mirza being the crucial cog in the latter. However, she won’t have the chance to improve on the bitter memories of Rio this time around with her close friend Bopanna, as Bopanna and Divij Sharan failed to qualify in the men’s doubles.

In Tokyo, Mirza will be in the company of Raina, who created some doubles firsts this year: a Grand Slam debut, a WTA title, a place in the top 100. This is territory that none of the three previous Olympic partners. de Mirza in women’s doubles had failed to penetrate. Sunitha Rao (Beijing 2008) got the best doubles ranking in 108th, Rushmi Chakravarthi (London 2012) 252nd and Prathana Thombare (Rio 2016) 125th. This is why Mirza thinks the Indian women’s duo will be more than just a participant in these Games.

“Ankita is definitely, at least in the standings, the best I have played with in India. She’s been playing well the last few years, and when she plays for the country she tends to go up a few notches. Usually when we’ve gone to women’s doubles (at the Olympics) it’s more of a performance than an expectation to win. But this time we have a chance to fight. We’ll be the underdogs, but it’s going to be fun. And it’s great to jump into something with a chance, ”said Mirza.

The two also made a conscious effort to integrate well on and off the pitch, a welcome change from the great Indian tennis controversies leading up to the Games. Raina and Mirza spent a week together at the latter’s home in Dubai in April before the play-offs of world group Billie Jean King Cup (for which the Mirza-Raina combo played a role in India’s historic qualification in last March). The two also spent time together in the UK while playing – and competing in mixed doubles – at Wimbledon.

“I’ve known Ankita for a long time now, but it was nice spending time and training together in Dubai. It was a good thing for both of us to get to know each other better and also to get to know each other’s games better. It helps with chemistry, ”Mirza said.

With finer chemistry and a fighting chance, Mirza has an air of optimism around her last dance on the Olympic stage.

“There were a lot of champions at the Olympics that nobody expected them to win,” said Mirza. “So I think every time we step on the pitch – whether it’s Leander (Paes) and me or Mahesh (Bhupathi) and me or Rohan and myself – we always have a chance. Because we went there, we played at the highest level for a long time, we won Grand Slam tournaments. So yes, we have a chance. And I would like to believe that I have the courage to play well in the Olympics. “


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Missy Franklin leads Laureus Sport for a good load for gender balance http://www.canadadancesport.com/missy-franklin-leads-laureus-sport-for-a-good-load-for-gender-balance/ http://www.canadadancesport.com/missy-franklin-leads-laureus-sport-for-a-good-load-for-gender-balance/#respond Wed, 14 Jul 2021 16:01:00 +0000 http://www.canadadancesport.com/missy-franklin-leads-laureus-sport-for-a-good-load-for-gender-balance/ Miss franklin has been a champion of gender equality and role model for young female (and male) athletes for years. She is part of the Laureus Academy and a leading figure in the Laureus Sport for Good campaign. Franklin wrote a letter based on Laureus’ annual review, which revealed some interesting numbers on the increase […]]]>

Miss franklin has been a champion of gender equality and role model for young female (and male) athletes for years. She is part of the Laureus Academy and a leading figure in the Laureus Sport for Good campaign.

Franklin wrote a letter based on Laureus’ annual review, which revealed some interesting numbers on the increase in numbers in women’s sports.

Olympic gold medalist Miss franklin wrote this about the Laureus Sport For Good:

In March, on International Women’s Day, along with my other female fellow Laureus Academy members, I was asked to express my best wishes for the coming year.

I remember saying, “My hopes revolve around every young girl who wakes up and knows that she has the opportunity to pursue her dreams and fight for her goals every day.

It’s a passion for me. I want to see girls and young women realize their potential.

What I love about being a member of Laureus Academy and supporting the work of Laureus Sport for Good is that through our programs we make it happen. It’s not just about being the best athlete, it’s about being a more competent and fulfilled person with better life skills and hope for a better future. Sport is the most amazing way to get there.

That’s why I loved reading the latest edition of the Laureus Sport for Good Review for 2020, which describes the continued progress of girls and young women in sport, wherever you look.

The numbers from the review show that grassroots sports with high or equal levels of female involvement are on the rise: netball by 73%, swimming over 200%, dancing by 112%, volleyball by 11. % and athletics by 41%.

These statistics show significant trends. Laureus Sport for Good is a global network that funds, supports and demonstrates the impact of more than 250 community sport programs around the world, which in 2020 directly involved more than 270,000 young participants. It’s not a world census, but it’s a fascinating snapshot of what’s going on.

And the trend is strong in many sports that are often considered a male domain, where girls are defying the norm. One of the biggest increases in women – surprisingly, or maybe not – is in boxing and martial arts, where Laureus supports several programs that are predominantly female or appealing to all.

It shows how committed Laureus is to its commitment to gender equality and its support for the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, notably through its social focus area “Women and Girls”, which provides grants. to organizations using sport to create equality, empowerment and safety for girls and young women.

I want every young girl to have something to admire, to aspire to and to learn, for we have all come to where we are today by standing on the shoulders of those who came before us. This is what the Laureus programs offer in more than 50 countries and territories around the world.

It’s heartwarming to see. And another step on the road.

I think after the 18 months we have had, we need this message more than ever.

– Miss Franklin

According to the review, the popularity of traditionally male-dominated sports is being challenged by sports and physical activity generally more favored by girls and young women, while girls are also increasing their participation in sports once considered predominantly male. – suggesting the idea of ​​”boys” “Sports” or “girls’ sports” may be becoming an outdated concept.

The numbers show that grassroots sports with strong or equal female participation are on the rise: netball by 73%, swimming over 200%, dance by 112%, volleyball by 11% and athletics by 41%. %. While long-established, predominantly male sports are on the decline: football by 17%, basketball by 6%, rugby by 18% and cricket by 13%.

The review followed the activities of more than 250 community sports programs around the world, involving more than 270,000 young participants, in 2020.

The trend is significantly stronger in many sports often seen as male dominated, where the girls in these targeted sport for development programs are defying the norm and overcoming the more established model of girls’ abandonment of sport. adolescence.

It’s another way for Missy Franklin to be a part of the whole sport.


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