City Life Org – Brooklyn Museum announces public programs in March for visitors of all ages

Salsa night at the Brooklyn Museum, 2021. (Photo: Kolin Mendez)

Virtual and in-person programming welcomes community members to the Museum

The Brooklyn Museum presents a robust lineup of programs for adults and children in March, including events observing Transgender Awareness Day and two years of the COVID-19 pandemic. Other programs include lectures, classes, tours, and special events that amplify the Museum’s exhibits and collection, serve its surrounding community, and support learning through the visual arts.

All visitors to the Museum’s in-person programs ages 5 and older must present proof of vaccination and valid identification. Masks are required, regardless of vaccination status, for all adults and children over 2 years old, in accordance with established procedures and guidelines. by the CDC and local health authorities. Some programs will take place online and through the Museum’s social media channels.

Museum members enjoy free or discounted tickets and early access to public programs.

The full program is as follows:

Stroller tour
Thursday, March 3, from 10 a.m. to 11:15 a.m.

Meet in the Education Gallery, 1st Floor
Tickets are $29 and include entry to Baseera Khan: I Am an Archive.

Enjoy an interactive stroller-friendly tour designed for children up to 24 months and their caregivers. This baby-friendly program features touchable objects, songs, exploration of exhibited artwork, and an opportunity to connect with other adults. The March tour explores Baseera Khan: I Am an Archive.

We are talking about virtual art
Thursday March 3, 6-7 p.m.

In line
Free, book your tickets in advance.

Participants join other English language learners and practice conversational English skills with an artwork-inspired discussion. All levels of English proficiency are welcome.

Artist’s view: Viva Ruiz on Andy Warhol
Thursday March 3, 7-8 p.m.

Morris A. and Meyer Schapiro Wing and Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Gallery, 5th floor
Tickets are $25 and include general admission to the Museum.

Viva Ruiz leads a guided tour of Andy Warhol: Revelation in this edition of Artist’s Eye, the Museum’s lecture series by contemporary artists who approach our special exhibitions from new perspectives. Ruiz is a trained community and nightlife activist and the creator of Thank God for Abortion. Conceived in 2015 in response to the closure of abortion clinics across the United States, Thank God for Abortion aims to de-stigmatize abortion and sexual and reproductive health care through art and protest. In this tour, Ruiz explores the themes and iconography of Catholicism in Warhol’s work and shares how she engaged with the idea of ​​God in her own practice.

salsa party
Thursday March 10, from 6 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

Martha A. and Robert S. Rubin Pavilion, 1st floor
Free, book your tickets in advance.

Close out the Museum’s season celebrating the art of salsa with an evening of social dancing and performances by the Balmir Dance Society. The evening begins with a class led by professional dancers at 6 p.m., then the dance floor opens with live music and performances from Brooklyn’s top Latin dance crews.

Brooklyn reads: In Sensorium with Tanaïs
Thursday March 10, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Auditorium Iris and B. Gerald Cantor, 3rd floor
Tickets are $20 and include after-hours entry to Baseera Khan: I Am an Archive.

Join writer and perfumer Tanaïs for a multi-sensory exploration of their latest book, In Sensorium: Notes for My People. Their memoir offers a critical alternative history of South Asia, written from the perspective of a Bangladeshi American Muslim woman. In Sensorium brings together a personal biography with centuries of South Asian perfume history, erotic and religious texts and testimonies from survivors. Between readings of the book, participants in the program will discover a selection of perfumes prepared by Tanaïs for this occasion, as well as a conversation with Samhita Mukhopadhyay, former editor-in-chief of Teen Vogue. Attendees can also enjoy an after-hours viewing of Baseera Khan: I Am an Archive.

An afternoon on collective care
Sunday, March 13, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Great Hall, 1st floor, Auditorium Iris and B. Gerald Cantor, 3rd floor
Free, book your tickets in advance.

Honor the two-year impact of the COVID-19 pandemic with an afternoon focused on care and healing. From 1:00 p.m. to 1:45 p.m., curator Eugénie Tsai leads a tour of The Slipstream: Reflection, Resistance, and Resilience in the Art of Our Time, focusing on themes of illness and support structures. Then, at 2:30 p.m., author Kamra Hakim, founder of black trans-led artist residency Activation Residency, launches her new book, Care Manual: Dreaming Care into Being, with a reading, conversation, and session. of dedications. Hakim is joined by Annika Hansteen-Izora, artist and author of Tenderness: An Honoring of My Queer Black Joy and Rage, and herbalist Marisa Hall for a conversation about healing within BIPOC communities. Finally, from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., instrumentalist Rachika Nayar performs pieces from her first album, Our Hands Against the Dusk, accompanied by cellist Issei Herr.

Virtual afternoons in Brooklyn
Tuesday, March 15, 3-4 p.m.

In line
Free, book your tickets in advance.

People with memory loss and their care partners can explore our collection together in this interactive tour led by Museum staff. Each program offers the opportunity to come together online and enjoy conversations, artwork and each other’s company. This month, discover how Baseera Khan uses their own bodies to visualize the lived experience of people at the intersection of Muslim and American identities in their exhibit Baseera Khan: I Am an Archive.

Pints ​​and Prints: Andy Warhol: Revelation
Thursday March 17, 6-7.30 p.m. and 8-9.30 p.m.

Martha A. and Robert S. Rubin Pavilion, 1st floor
Tickets are $35 and include after-hours admission to Andy Warhol: Revelation, art materials in a bag from the Brooklyn Museum, and a free drink.

Attendees can grab a beer and create their own Pop art prints inspired by Andy Warhol: Revelation. Teaching artist Sam Kelly leads a course in collagraphic printmaking where materials are glued to a board to create a reusable 3D plate for inking drawing on Andy Warhol’s signature silkscreen practice.

ASL visit
Saturday March 26, 2-3 p.m.

Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, 4th Floor
Free, book your tickets in advance.

Visitors from the D/Deaf community can experience the Museum’s collection on an American Sign Language (ASL) tour, led by a Deaf teacher-artist. This tour is in ASL only, without voice interpretation. After a brief encounter, tour participants will explore how Baseera Khan uses their own bodies to visualize the lived experience of people at the intersection of Muslim and American identities in Baseera Khan: I Am an Archive.

Movie: My Name is Pauli Murray
Thursday March 31, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Auditorium Iris and B. Gerald Cantor, 3rd floor
Tickets are $16 and include after-hours admission to The Slipstream: Reflection, Resistance, and Resilience in the Art of Our Time.

Join us on International Transgender Awareness Day for a screening of My Name Is Pauli Murray (Julie Cohen and Betsy West, 2021, 91 min.). Rev. Dr. Pauli Murray (1910-1985) shaped historic litigation and awareness of issues of racial and gender equity. Murray pioneered the development of intersectional legal theory, played an important role in the civil rights and women’s movements during the 1960s, co-founded the National Organization for Women (NOW), and overcame the gender barriers to being ordained an Episcopal priest. The screening is followed by a conversation with director Julie Cohen.

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